CALL TRACKING AND LOCAL SEO

Matthew Carter
Hello friends, my name is Matthew Carter. I’m a professional link builder for a large SEO agency in New York City.

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Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to use GTM to track form submissions:

That doesn’t mean rankings and traffic should never be looked at, I’ll go into this later.

That’s quite a list.

Google My Business also shows website visits but it’s not very accurate. In order to track correctly, it’s preferred to add UTM tracking codes.

When you’re setting up call tracking, you want to be tracking phone calls from Organic Search and Google My Business. I’m not going to rehash content that’s already written on how to implement CallRail, here’s their support article on getting started.

SETTING UP UTM TRACKING CODES IN GOOGLE MY BUSINESS.

Bully for you showing your pretty graph from a third-party tool that shows traffic is up and to the right. Show me first-time phone calls and form submissions.

Website URL: Your website Campaign source: google Campaign medium: organic Campaign name: maps Or, you can simply grab the UTM code below: ?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=maps.

After you have finished setting up this tracking, you can marry the data into one report at Google Data Studio. I’ll have a post on how to set that up at a later date.

There are a lot of local SEO tools out there that offer local rank tracking. Here are my favorites:

You’ve invested time and effort into your local search efforts and want to see how well your work is helping your or your client’s business.

You’ll now start to see accurate data showing up in Google Analytics and Google Search Console.

For call tracking, CallRail is my go-to. There are a lot of other call tracking providers and I know another popular provider is CallTrackingMetrics. Feel free to compare them and pick the one you like.

You should add the UTM tracking code to your website. If you have an appointment URL, add it there, too, but you may considering adding an additional parameter to track appointment URL clicks. Here’s what that UTM code can look like: ?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=maps&utm_content=appointment If you have Products on your Google My Business listing, you should add UTM tracking codes to them, too. You can swap out appointment for product in the above UTM tracking code but you should differentiate each product and name it accordingly. ?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=maps&utm_content=PRODUCTNAME.

I have one simple belief when it comes to tracking. Rankings and traffic don’t pay your bills, new customers do. The single goal of any local SEO campaign is to get more leads that turn into new customers.

Now, should you be looking at rankings and organic traffic? Sure.

SETTING UP CALL TRACKING & FORM SUBMISSION TRACKING.

There are several ways to track form submissions in Google Analytics. We prefer to use Google Tag Manager.

Rankings from searches you do? Rankings from a rank tracking tool? Google Analytics traffic? Google Analytics events tied to organic traffic? Google Search Console? Google My Business Insights? New business? Phone Calls?

Google My Business shows phone calls, why use call tracking? Google My Business is wrong and when it comes to phone calls, it only counts mobile click-to-calls. There are other reasons but that’s for another day. After you create a local call tracking phone number for Google My Business, you’ll want to use it as your Primary phone number. Take your real phone number and add it as an additional phone number. Save changes and you’re done.

When setting up rank tracking, it’s important how you set up locations. How you rank in one zip code might be entirely different in another. When setting up locations, stick to zip codes, not individual cities. When setting up your keywords, use both city-specific and non-city-specific versions.

What do you look at?

Sometimes marketers can get a little tracking crazy and will be tempted to add a call tracking number to local directory sites. Going back to NAP consistency again, this scenario can cause issues and we don’t recommend doing it. This thread on the Local Search Forum does a great job explaining this. Darren Shaw states:

“I don’t think there is much benefit to putting a tracking number on all your listings. It would cost quite a bit in call tracking fees to make a number for each site, and the data you get back will basically be ‘no one is calling from this directory’”.

While I don’t recommend canceling call tracking altogether since it’s important for any type of online marketing, there are times where you might want to switch providers for a handful of reasons. When you cancel with a call tracking provider, you need to release the phone numbers back to them since technically they own them. This can cause issues if a client has that number saved. While there’s no real way to get around this, it’s not usually as big of a problem as business owners often think it will be. Everything is so accessible online these days and people don’t typically save phone numbers like they once did. Personally, I don’t have the phone number for any business saved on my phone. If I need to call my dentist, nail salon, chiropractor, etc. I google their name and call them from their GMB listing. Now, what about the people that did save your number? Again, things are so accessible online so if a current client gets an “out of service” message when they call that canceled number, the next natural step would be Googling your business name. Once they do that, they’ll find your current phone number. Another way a business can get around that is by making sure to include your local number in all messaging that goes out to your clients. This can be in email signatures, a welcome email, mailers, etc.

There are some instances where you might want to use a tracking number on one or two top directory sites. For example, if you’re using a paid service and want to track ROI. Other than that, you should always use a local number on directory sites.

This question comes up a lot since NAP consistency has historically been seen as a significant ranking factor. Over the past few years, Google has gotten much better at understanding the core elements of a business so having a few NAP inconsistencies isn’t as bad for ranking as it once was. However, when it comes to call tracking none of that even matters thanks to something called Dynamic Number Insertion (DNI).

Myth #4 – If my clients saved my tracking number, they won’t be able to reach me if I ever cancel the service.

While people also think that using a static call tracking number (a number that doesn’t flip) on a GMB listing will be bad for NAP inconsistency (I’ll cover this later), that’s not the main question we’re asked. It’s a common misconception that using a tracking number on a GMB listing is against Google’s Guidelines. The guidelines state “Use a local phone number instead of central, call center helpline number whenever possible.” but it doesn’t say anything specifically about call tracking numbers. Also, notice “whenever possible” meaning that there are times when you can use a non-local number. You’ll see this a lot with chains, where they use a central toll-free number on all their listings. We’ve used call tracking numbers on our listings for years and have never run into guideline issues.

We use call tracking – a lot! And over the years we’ve noticed that both clients and members of the Local Search Forum tend to ask the same questions about call tracking. With that in mind, I decided to poll the team here at Sterling Sky to come up with our top 5 myths about using call tracking with Local SEO.

Going back to NAP consistency, the way you add the tracking number to the listing is important. It’s best practice to add the tracking number to the primary phone number field and then add the local business number as a secondary phone number. Doing this makes sure that Google understands that the local number is still associated with the business.

And See These Other Articles By SEO Expert Nikki Brown:

This is partially true. If you get a new client through an ad using call tracking, their cookies will make them see that number every time they enter your site in the future. So it’s safe to assume that they’ll likely call that tracking number again. Since they’re no longer a new lead, you need to make sure you’re not counting them as one. There are different ways to do this depending on which call tracking software you’re using. We typically use Call Tracking Metrics and in their system, you want to look at the “Period Unique” or “Globally Unique” data. These 2 data groups only count the unique callers (for that period or since you started using tracking), so using the example above, that person who found you in an ad will only be counted once. If you’re not sure how to only see data on first-time callers using your call tracking software, contact their support team.

If you’re still on the fence about including call tracking in your Local SEO (or any marketing) plan, give it a try. Most call tracking software services will offer you a trial period and if they don’t have one on their site, contact them to see if they’ll give you one. We’ve found that using call tracking is essential for calculating ROI, identifying opportunities, isolating issues, and so much more. The data you collect through call tracking will make you a much better (and smarter) marketer.

By using DNI (sometimes referred to as a number flipper) you can change the way a phone number displays on your site for a user, depending on how they entered. For example, if they entered your site by clicking an ad they’d see one number but if they entered through an organic click, they’d see a different number. DNI doesn’t change the way your phone number is coded on the site so Google’s bots will see your local phone number, meaning it won’t hurt your NAP consistency.

Nikki has been working in the Local SEO industry since early 2014. She is passionate about helping small businesses and uses her ever growing knowledge of the industry to help them succeed. Nikki has a Business Management degree from Ryerson University, where she majored in Marketing.

Myth #3 – Call tracking data isn’t accurate because it will count existing clients as new leads.

Myth #2 – It’s a bad idea to use a call tracking number on your GMB listing.

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