SEO LINK ROUNDUP

Matthew Carter
Hello friends, my name is Matthew Carter. I’m a professional link builder for a large SEO agency in New York City.

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Yearly roundups can be great because they become year-long resources for the entire coming year. They’re a great way for people to look back on what happened that year and use that for their own analysis, and they can be chock full of guides for crucial developments in the industry for the year. They also make great evergreen content.

Ah, the roundup post. One of my favorite strategies that I probably don’t use quite as much as I should. They’re a great strategy for building links, building relationships, building a position in your industry, and generally producing content on a regular basis that people look forward to seeing.

All of this is why link roundups are great as both a link building strategy and as a content marketing strategy. Can you see why I like them so much yet?

Picking a Schedule.

Weekly . Weekly is a common schedule for the lower-end roundup post style, the kind where you aren’t putting a lot of effort into writing descriptions or choosing only the best, most useful guides and evergreen posts. It’s difficult to pull off because you need a blog that’s active enough to support weekly themed posts while still posting other content. As such, I recommend it only to blogs that have multiple authors and are already posting near-daily or multiple times per day.

Incidentally, this is why I like having an intro to my roundups. I can include two links. The first goes to the directly previous roundup, and the second is edited in later, to the next sequential roundup. This way people who like the roundups as resources can navigate to the next one or to the most recent one, or browse backwards to see what other kinds of content you’ve featured. Sure, it takes a little maintenance to make sure you’re always adding that link, but it’s not really that bad; just make a note to add it whenever you publish a new one.

Google . Since your topic is something you’re familiar with and write about yourself, you should be familiar with the usual keywords used to find content in that niche. Search for those with Google’s time filters to limit how old the content can be. You can also use Google News to look for high profile news content in that niche.

Since I love the technique, I’m going to tell you all about how to do it.

You can do a general industry content roundup, but sometimes it pays to have a narrower, more dedicated theme to your posts. When you do broad coverage, you end up linking to the same posts everyone else knows, because it’s just “the good content published by the big names this month” or whatever.

All you’re doing here is letting them know that you featured them. Don’t ask for anything, don’t try to solicit a link in return, but be open and polite if they respond. Chat with them and build a relationship! After all, isn’t that what it’s all about, in the end?

I’ve noticed that a lot of articles about link roundups are talking about them from a submission perspective: how to get your content featured in those roundups. I’ll cover that a bit later one, but my main focus here is about how to produce these roundup posts yourself. Here’s my tips and considerations, if you’re interested in being the content producer in the equation.

What are Roundup Posts?

First, you can use the roundup as a way to gain more newsletter subscribers . In your content, include a call to action that asks users to subscribe to your newsletter if they like the roundup. Make this a special newsletter – not your usual lead generation or marketing newsletter – that you use to promote your roundups. You can even do a brief daily digest sort of newsletter here, or you can send out pared-down versions of your roundups before you publish the main post, or implement some other gimmick.

Weekly roundups tend to be more intimate and can feature a wider variety of blogs, though, which makes them better for broad-base link building and relationship building. They have their benefits, they’re just difficult to pull off consistently.

You can use this newsletter as a way to keep people in the loop and rope them into further marketing as well, usually by including some of your own content or advertising in the body of the newsletter. It’s up to you to develop a strategy that works for you.

Some link roundups look a lot like this one from Zac Johnson. Their link roundups are fast and to the point. They include a heading with the broad topic, links with the names of posts, and that’s it.

Hey there [name]! My name is [your name], owner of [blog name]. Each [week/month/quarter/year] I produce a roundup titled [Name Of Your Roundup Series]. Each [period] I feature the best content on [topic] published that [period]. I’m pleased to tell you that your post, [Name of Linked Post] was featured in this [period’s] roundup! You can see it here. [link to roundup post]. If you have any questions, let me know!

Picking a Niche.

Other link roundups – which I find both more effective and better for SEO – look like this one from UpCity. They have headings for the topics, and links to each post they want to promote, but each one also has some description of what is on the other side of the link. They specifically link to the author name, but I’ve seen it with the author name, the blog post title, the blog name, and even just descriptive sentences.

You can get a lot of benefits from link and content roundup posts, from both sides of the coin.

Social media . Twitter is especially good for this. Monitor the common industry hashtags, aggregators, and other accounts that are likely to be sharing links to good content. If you like the content, add it to your list.

Have you ever tried to run a roundup before? If so, has it worked out for you, or did you encounter issues? Feel free to tell your story in the comments!

As the person curating the roundup :

Okay, so there’s a bit more to it than that. A roundup post has a few things that separate it from a normal blog post.

I was looking for some link round ups and I found yours. I was hoping I could submit some articles for your consideration. I’ve listed them below, broken down by category, with a full title and description so you can include any of them that you think will be a good fit for next week’s round up.

So, you’re ready to participate in a link roundup, but where? When? How often? Well, obviously, you want to participate often, and consistently, but you don’t need to pimp out every single blog post you publish. Save it for the really good ones, the ones you’ve put a lot of effort into, and the ones you want some extra help promoting.

Of course, you don’t have to do a blog post round up – you could do your own variation of round up with your favorite tweets, Facebook posts, pins, or Instagram photos or videos. Or you could do a round up of each – curating content for each, and filling your editorial calendar with a number of posts for the month so it becomes less to worry about.

The idea behind them is to share content with your readers from other sources – which is what we do when we’re curating content for our social media channels. Chances are, if you’re blogging, you’re taking the time to read other people’s blogs, too. (If you’re not, what’s with that? Read and connect!) This can help you find content from other sources your audience would enjoy.

My name is [your name] and I’m a blogger at [your site/domain name.]

Getting Featured in Roundups.

A word of advice, though – lurk on the blog for a while, reading various posts and leaving thoughtful comments before sending your pitch. You’ll likely have a better success rate that way.

Use content curation tools to help you find link-worthy content:

A link round up is basically a blog posts that features links to other people’s blog posts. Usually, you’ll find them on a weekly or monthly basis, and they are themed around a topic related to the blog that’s hosting it. You can find them in virtually any niche, too.

List of articles with title, description, and link to post.

There’s a good chance the bloggers you link out to will stop by your post and leave a comment to thank you. Then, they’ll likely share it with their own audience because it helps them when they can show they were featured elsewhere. When they do, you get traffic and exposure.

Only include this next part if it’s true…Because if you’re not actually going to write one of those posts and feature them, that’s not a nice thing to say. You want to build a rapport, and not following through on your words is a good way not to do that.

Thanks for your consideration. Have a great day!

Now, turn to Google and start searching:

Though the list is small, as of the time of this writing in January 2017, these are still active. Several others exist, but haven’t been updated since September 2016 or earlier.

What is a Link Roundup?

Do you want to pitch a blogger to include your work in their round up? Here’s a sample script you can adjust to your needs and use. Shoot the email over a week or so before the next roundup goes live.

Hi [Name of Blog Owner],

Just click on the link and check to see the most recent post – usually you’ll be linked to the host blog, where you can see an archive of the link up posts. If there’s a recent date, then it’s a good sign it’s still active.

After you’ve gained some ground, you can choose to continue doing it manually, or you can turn to any of these tools to make it easier for you:

Your readers will get valuable content, and because you’re publishing a roundup, it’s one less blog topic you’ll have to worry about, whether it’s for the week, or for the month.

To make things a little easier for you, here’s a list of marketing related link round ups to check out.

Publishing Your Own Link Roundups.

For instance, if you were looking for recipe round ups, you’d find this resource, with a full list of link ups that are hosted every day of the week. The problem with some of them, however, is they may no longer be active, so you’ll have to do a bit more digging to make sure it’s still active.

I’m going to be writing a post featuring all the blogs that host links ups, so I’d love to feature you, as well.

Some bloggers put together their own roundups of what they find interesting, so to increase your chances of getting featured, always make sure you’re putting your best foot forward, and working on your own to promote your work. People have to see it before it gets included, after all.

In the beginning, until your link roundup starts gaining traction and people know to look for it, you’ll likely have to do everything manually so there’s a decent amount of content for the post.

You can find a decent number of places to start with these phrases, but there are also other variants to try, like “best of” “Wednesday link up” (where you can sub any day of the week) and so on. Add the “intitle:” search operator and Google will only search for the words in the title, making it even easier to find the linkups you’re looking for.

Whether you’re a business owner or marketer, you know the value of traffic to your website. One of the best ways to build traffic and links is through a link roundup. And, if you choose to host your own, you’ll get a piece of curated content to post on your blog. In this guide, I’ll explain what a link round up is, and how to include them in your strategy to build relationships with other bloggers.

When you network with other bloggers, it’s critical to establish real relationships with them. One of the most effective ways to stay off their radar is to approach them for the first time and ask them if they’d mind mentioning your posts.

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