YOAST SEO GOOGLE ANALYTICS CODE

Matthew Carter
Hello friends, my name is Matthew Carter. I’m a professional link builder for a large SEO agency in New York City.

TRY OUR PACKAGES

Small Package
$49
Human Articles with Readable Spin
TIER 1
15 High DA web 2.0 Properties
10 High DA Trusted Profiles
20 High DA Bookmarks
5 EDU Profiles
50 Powerful Web 2.0 Profiles
10 Blog Platform Articles
10 High DA Documents Links
10 Manual Image Submission Links
10 Niche Related Blog Comments
1 Weebly Post
1 Tumblr Post
1 Wordpress Post
1 Blogspot Post
1 Medium Post
50 Facebook Reshares
50 Twitter Retweets
100 Pinterest Repins
TIER 2
Blog Comments LinkJuice
Bookmarks LinkJuice
Instant Link Indexer Services
Drip Feed Pinging
Order Now
Medium Package
$99
80 Unique Human Articles no spin
TIER 1
30 High DA web 2.0 Properties
25 High DA Trusted Profiles
30 High DA Bookmarks
7 EDU Profiles
70 Web 2.0 Media Profiles
25 Blog Platform Articles
15 High DA Documents Links
12 Image Sharing Backlinks
20 Niche Related Blog Comments
10 High DA Forum Profiles
10 Press Releases
Video Creation
10 Video Submissions
Power Point Creation
10 Power Point Submissions
1 EDU Blog Post
1 Weebly Post
5 High PA Tumblr Posts
1 Wordpress Post
1 Blogspot Post
1 Medium Post
1 Mix.com Share
1 Flickr Share
1 Myspace Share
100 Facebook Reshares
100 Twitter Retweets
250 Pinterest Repins
TIER 2
Blog Comments LinkJuice
Bookmarks LinkJuice
Article Submission
Guestbook Comments
Social Network Profiles
Static Links
Referrer Links
Instant Link Indexer Services
Drip Feed Pinging
Order Now
Big Package
$159
140 Unique Human Articles no spin
TIER 1
50 High DA web 2.0 Properties
40 High DA Trusted Profiles
40 High DA Bookmarks
10 EDU Profiles
100 Web 2.0 Media Profiles
50 Blog Platform Articles
20 High DA Documents Links
15 Image Sharing Backlinks
30 Niche Related Blog Comments
20 High DA Forum Profiles
20 Press Releases
Video Creation
20 Video Submissions
Power Point Creation
20 Power Point Submissions
1 EDU Blog Post
1 Weebly Post
10 High PA Tumblr Posts
1 Wordpress Post
1 Blogspot Post
1 Medium Post
1 Mix.com Share
1 Flickr Share
1 Myspace Share
1 Penzu Post
1 Ex.co Post
1 Behance Post
1 Voog Post
1 Linkedin Post
1 EzineArticle Post
250 Facebook Reshares
300 Twitter Retweets
500 Pinterest Repins
TIER 2
Blog Comments LinkJuice
Bookmarks LinkJuice
Article Submission
Guestbook Comments
Social Network Profiles
Static Links
Referrer Links
Instant Link Indexer Services
Drip Feed Pinging
Order Now

PORTFOLIO













Unfortunately, the organic keyword tab that’s listed under the campaign tab doesn’t do much anymore nowadays. Apart from showing (not set) it just shows you where people end up and doesn’t provide many keywords (np = not provided).

The first one is via filtering the data in the table: you have to click the “Secondary dimension” drop-down and click Acquisition > Medium. Additionally, you can click Source/Medium if you want to specify per search engine. Clicking the checkbox for “Organic” medium and hitting “Plot Rows” again, will give you the line graph for your total and organic traffic. It’ll also show you other traffic sources, which is always interesting.

If you notice the number of organic traffic is declining, then you need to work on your SEO as well. Especially if the decline is large. Perhaps you’ve got a crawlability or another technical SEO issue. If the decrease is drastic, all alarm bells should go off. Dive into your Google Search Console and check if you can find what’s causing the decline.

What does organic traffic say about my SEO?

As said before, Google is taking responsiveness of websites more and more seriously and it has become a true ranking factor in mobile search results, so it’s really imperative that you improve your mobile site as much as possible and keep tracking this for your SEO.

First thing you need to do is add Google Search Console to your Google Analytics account. Before you can do this, you need a Google Search Console account which you can easily set up with our plugin. If you have an account, go to the Admin section in Google Analytics at Property level and look for All products in the Product linking section. In the video below is explained how to make the connection.

If you’re noticing an increase in organic traffic, well done! Think about what you’ve been doing lately that might have caused this increase. You want to know these kinds of things because it’ll help you understand your SEO better.

Tip: To make the data even clearer, you can add another filter (using the search bar) to only include medium containing “Organic.” This will give you just the organic traffic data for every page.

Google Analytics offers a way to integrate Google Search Console with your Google Analytics data. And that’s awesome because now you can combine the metrics of these two tools together.

One of the first indications of how your website’s SEO is doing is looking at the amount of traffic coming to your website. In Google Analytics, you can find an overview of your traffic in the Audience section. This tells you how many sessions there were on your website in a given time period.

Google Analytics and Google Search Console.

The bounce rate is important because it tells you something about the quality of your traffic and/or the quality of the page. It has an indirect influence on your SEO. If people quickly jump back to the search results after a glimpse on your page, that means they probably haven’t found what they’re looking for. Google takes this to mean your page isn’t relevant enough for the keyword the person has searched for, and rightfully so.

If you want a view that’s a bit more precise, you can click the pie chart icon to see exact numbers and percentages of the total. And if you want to see all the organic traffic combined into one, simply click the medium tab. Of course, you can again plot the row for the line graph here as well.

If you want to see your analytics at a per page level, you have to go to Behavior > Site Content > Landingpages. Here you’ll see your site’s top 10 landingpages, ranked on the number of sessions. If you have a specific page you want to look at, you can simply fill in the URL (without the domain name) in the search bar. You’ll now be able to see that page’s data. However, these are still all the sessions, not specified to traffic coming from search engines. To find the traffic originating from search engines, there are two ways to go.

Next to making sure your mobile SEO is top notch, site speed is a ranking factoras well. Not only is it a ranking factor, it has its impact on conversion and the usability of your site as well. Checking speed performance of your pages and improving it, is a big win for your entire site. Google Analytics has a special Site Speed section which you can find under Behavior > Site Speed. If you click on Page Timings, you can see the Average Page Load Time compared to the site average. Additionally, you’ll get a quick overview of pages that are ‘slow’ so this immediately gives you a to-do list of pages you need to optimize first. There are a couple of site speed tools that can help you with optimizing your site’s speed.

Page-specific SEO monitoring.

The second way to go is creating a segment that only includes ‘Organic traffic.’ I absolutely adore segments, because it makes Google Analytics so much easier to use. You can read more about my love for segments in the ‘Why use segments in Google Analytics‘ post. Google Analytics offers you a ready-made segment called ‘Organic traffic.’ Choose that segment from the list, and voila, you’ll only see traffic coming from search engines. Now you can analyze all pages in the Behavior section and check if you see an upward trend (or not).

The above only tells you how your overall SEO is doing. However, most times, you’d want to focus on something more specific than your entire site. You’d want to focus on a specific page or post.

If you click on Behavior > Site Content > Landing Pages, you’ll get a list of pages through which people enter your site. Landing pages are important because they’re the first thing your visitors will see. They are literally pages that people land on coming from a traffic source. An important metric on this screen is the ‘Bounce Rate.’ This metric gives you the percentage of people that left your landing page without having done anything on that page. And although Google doesn’t take the Google Analytics bounce rate into account as a ranking factor, it does look at how quick people hit the back button and return to the search results page. So you want visitors to spend more time on your pages and, preferably, even engage with your site.

Once connected it needs a bit of time before you see actual Google Search Console data in your Google Analytics reports. But when there’s data, there’s magic! You can find this magic under Acquisition, there’s a Google Search Console section with landing pages, queries, countries and devices. I find the landing pages report especially interesting:

First of all you can see which landing pages have most impressions and so but that’s information you can see in just Google Search Console of course. The added benefit for having this data in Google Analytics is that you can also see metrics from Google Analytics. Like bounce rate, conversion rate and transactions (if you have an online shop). Here you can find if there’s a relation between Click Through Rate (CTR) and Bounce rate. Do landing pages with a high CTR have a low bounce rate? Or do they have a high bounce rate? If that’s the case then you immediately have something you can take action upon. Another example, if you see that a page has a reasonably high conversion rate but a bit of a poor ranking, that it’s worth your while to put some more SEO effort into that page.

Are you wondering which words attract visitors to your site? Do you want to know why people might be leaving the site? Google Analytics is the first choice, and most popular answer, for these questions.

The biggest stumbling block in the beginning is figuring out how to do the integration and where to place the code that Google Analytics needs. The Google Analytics plugin by Yoast is an easy solution and involves no messing around with the code. Here’s how to use the Google Analytics plugin:

WordPress Google Analytics Plugin by Yoast.

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.